CEO OF KATALYST – POORVI SHAH

In the fifth story of GoBarefootRealHeroes we are sharing an inspiring story of Poorvi Shah. 

To give of your possessions is to give little but to give of yourself is to give everything” -by Kahlil Gibran.  

 

This is the maxim that defines me. 
When I was in my finance career, I did take some volunteering initiatives like painting a school or 
teaching a module at a public school, but what I did most was write a cheque annually typically to an 
education focused Not for Profit.  
How many people, male or females can see their dreams come true? Either they don’t have access 
or they are pursuing someone else’s dreams. I was fortunate to be one of four sisters each of whom 
got the opportunity and encouragement to pursue career of choiceMy children were fortunate to 
be in an environment where education was a given. I had seen my father work his way up and teach 
me that there was no short cut to hard work. I strongly believe that education is a leveller and can be 
a life changer. 
Fast forward a few years, and I took a break from corporate career and in another couple years I was 
pulled into the social sector not because I had planned it that way. I landed in Social Sector by 
chance, but once I did, there was no looking back. I grew professionally and personally. The beauty 
of being in the sector is that there is as much impact on oneself as on the beneficiaries. It’s a 
win-win. 
Having come from an MBA and finance background, management and numbers came naturally to 
me. I leveraged that to develop a leadership program at The Akanksha Foundation and then also got 
into donor management and reporting. I was in an organization, an NGO,  filled with leaders mostly 
women, and only a few men. Lot of my myths were busted and stereotypes broken. I was finally 
educated! However, the joy came out of working with and nurturing the young minds and 
maximising their potential. I had learnt a lot from travel, exposure, reading and believed the same 
was required for these young minds. I helped implement the community research project, organised 
leadership outbound, participated with my students in Global forums such as UN WASH forum, went 
on field visits to places they would not have otherwise.   
When I got an opportunity to work with girls in higher education, I realised that it was time to move 
on and apply my learning and skills to bridge the gap which only Katalyst seemed to be working on. I 
could resonate with the vision. When I went on to follow my dream of an MBA in Finance, only a 
third of my MBA class was girls. The ratio was even more skewed when I entered the venture capital 
world, a male bastion. Hence, I was determined to bring some balance if not change the statistics in 
favour of women. 
I have been associated with Katalyst for over five years and it reinforces my belief that young girls 
have so much potential and ambition, all they need is opportunity and exposure. And they are hard 
working too. These girls are mired in social and financial pressure and on top of that there’s 
academic pressure.
Despite that they are willing to attend classes to learn and to hone their skills so that they get better job opportunities with a higher salary package, navigate the workplace and move up the career ladder. I am glad to say that these girls are making their own decisions about when to get married, who to get married to, when to have children and when and whether to take 
a career break. There are girls who are moving cities and countries because they have better job 
opportunities. 
Most of the panels I have attended on women empowerment focus on livelihood, vocational  
training, tailoring, beauty courses, etc. It’s required but Why not think of her as an Engineer or an 
Orthopedic Doctor. Lack of role models cause further entry barrier through barrier in mind. Vicious 
circle!  
  
And it is not just a local problem, contrary to popular belief. It is the same story everywhere.  
I was at the Global women in STEM leadership summit in Atlanta .The challenges  
women face there are ditto! One of my co-panelists shared how she was asked to go and get a 
degree in MRS when she expressed interest in pursuing Maths in college. I was racking my brain to 
figure out the full form of MRS when fortunately a young college student in the audience asked what 
it stood for? To my disbelief, Mrs. was the answer! And one would think the USA would be more 
liberal. Well not yet as far as women in STEM, gender parity and representation in the workforce is 
concerned. 
 I am passionate about equity in education, I believe in the potential of youth especially women and I 
thrive on relationships!  
 
I believe that the biggest challenge to a woman is the woman herself. The roadblocks mental and 
 
physical are laid by a woman herself. She needs to believe that she is a leader and that she can! 
 
Easier said than done. 
 
 

 

One comment

  • hi, the development sector today needs women leaders who care to understand the causes related to most vulnerable sections without a voice/representation to fight with them , join forces!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*